Elisa Casseri

Elisa Casseri

BIOGRAPHY

Elisa Casseri is a writer, playwright and author. She has published the books Hydraulic Theory of Families (Elliot, 2014), The Botany of Lies (Fandango, 2019) and the investigation Grand Tour sentimentale (Solferino, 2022). In 2015, he won the 53rd edition of the Premio Riccione for Theatre with L’orizzonte degli eventi – a text subsequently selected by the Italian Playwrights Project and published in an anthology in the United States and Spain. In 2018, he wrote with Filippo Renda the play Circeo. The Massacre, produced by the Women’s Theater of Calenzano. In 2021, her anthology trilogy Triptych of Rooms (consisting of The Game Theory, The Event Horizon and The Pole of Inaccessibility) has become a radio drama series for Science and Science Fiction from the Valley, a production of the Theater of Rome, directed by Manuela Cherubini. Author of the blogs “Melotechnics” and “Memoirs of an Estath√® drinker,” and contributes to the magazine “Nuovi Argomenti.”

In 2022 his short story “La dote” was published in the anthology Data di nascita, edited by Teresa Ciabatti and published by Solferino. The same year she contributed one of her texts to the collection I figli che non voglio (Mondadori), edited by Simonetta Sciandivasci.

PUBLICATIONS

Title:
I figli che non voglio
Publisher:
Mondadori

Release date:
29-11-2022

I figli che non voglio cover

A roundup of unorthodox interventions, full of intelligence and critical sense, an essential vademecum for anyone interested in the topic. A discussion that provides us with excellent tools to “stop thinking that demographic winter is a moral or economic issue: it is, instead, a question of perspective, which imposes new lenses; it is a question of political geography and reorganization of the world according to new criteria.”

Demographic winter: and before us lie barren, frozen plains to put The Iron Throne to shame, echoes of Shakespearean tragedies resound in the mind. No more children are being made in Italy, where will our civilization go, but most importantly: who will pay our pensions? But what is the point of insisting that the only way to keep the system going is to procreate, even where women – to be precise, a minority of women quantified by ISTAT as 5 percent – despite being in a position to have children, do not want them? With respect to the issue of motherhood, schematisms often win out and women find themselves represented either as victims of a country in which having children is a privilege – the precariousness of work, low wages, inaccessible kindergartens, the welfare state that does not provide as it should – or as a handful of cynical, superficial, careerists and future repentants destined for a lonely old age embittered by the regret of not having reproduced. Between these two poles are the real people, to whom the interventions collected in this book give voice. Many women, but also some men, who have taken up the challenge launched by Simonetta Sciandivasci with lucidity and irony on the pages of the “Mirror,” a cultural insert of the “Stampa,” a challenge to question why one becomes a parent or not, to reason about the different possible physiognomies of a family. There are those who advocate procreative agnosticism, because becoming a parent is something so intimate and personal as to make principled positions impossible; those who insist on the need to make adoption easier for single parents; those who blame the weight of past conditioning; and those who try to argue the case for unconsciousness. There are those who consider egg freezing before embarking on a path of transition from woman to man, those who argue that fathers are quite happy not to have parental equality, and those who lament the omnipotence of mothers in the event of separation. There are women who demand more respect for choosing not to be mothers, men who try to dismantle the narcissisms, frailties, and contradictions of being a father. And then there are dowries waiting patiently in trunks, grandmothers and mothers waiting for grandchildren from daughters who carelessly cross the threshold of thirty-five… A roundup of unorthodox interventions, full of intelligence and critical sense, an essential vademecum for anyone interested in the subject. A debate that provides us with excellent tools to “stop thinking that the demographic winter is a moral or economic issue: it is, instead, a question of perspective, which imposes new lenses; it is a question of political geography and reorganization of the world according to new criteria.”

Title:
Data di nascita
Publisher:
Solferino

Release date:
08-11-2022

Data di nascita

“We are born every day, every time we find another piece of us, every time we discover ourselves different.”

We come into the world blind. In the sense of unaware: exposed to a bombardment of experiences, unaware of who we are, uncertain of the blurred boundaries between the self and the world. Moving from perception to knowledge is a lifelong endeavor. And this is how we are born many times: perhaps with the discovery of sex, or with the first great pain, the first injustice. Birth can also be a death, and vice versa. What is this moment, how does it manifest, at what cost? Eleven leading authors from the new Italian literary scene take on the task of narrating this turning point. Tales like gems that give us back a sense of the uniqueness of life experiences in the multiplicity of destinies, and illuminate a truth: perhaps this instant of epiphany has never been as significant and intense as it is today, for generations who are experiencing it earlier and earlier and who know how to recognize it with singular maturity. Teresa Ciabatti writes: “One never finishes being born, say the eleven writers, very different from each other, yet united by generation. To be part of the generation raised alone, the mother boys as Achille Lauro calls them. Raised without adults as parents worked, and grandparents were not there (far away, dead). Here they are free children with the world at their fingertips – be it even a television or a computer through which to imagine.